I Like What I Like

sanguinarysanguinity:

kingloptr:

tamahi88:

copperbadge:

elliphantidelli:

"kneel"
something i drew for a banner competition :) 

POCAHONTAS AS CAP THO

Why not? She’s an original American

THATS WHY WE’RE EXCITED BC THEY GOT IT RIGHT

Did they get it right, though? There’s a long, long history of Native people being co-opted or coerced into displaying the symbols of US patriotism. And it was always done to deny the Native genocide, legitimize the US state, and consolidate the US’s power.
For example, there’s a lot of old-fashioned rhetoric out there that Native people were the first US patriots. (Take Paul Dyck’s Brulé: The Sioux People of the Rosebud, in which he describes 19th century Lakota — who were at war with the US! — as “American patriots” and asserts that “throughout the trying historical period of westward expansion, the Indian of the West never lost their allegiance to America.”) I run across this kind of talk a lot, in which someone asserts that a Native people were all about liberty and freedom JUST LIKE AMERICA, thus there’s just one big unbroken tradition of AMERICAFREEDOMLIBERTY leading from Native people to the US nation-state. What’s genocide? What’s colonialism? It was just Native-USians acting as the warm-up act for the American-Usians.
Furthermore, there’s a long, long history of the US government requiring subjugated Native people to display symbols of US patriotism. Know why so many powwows are on the Fourth of July? Because the government’s Indian Agents would only permit festivals that celebrated Christian holidays or the US nation-state.
Moreover, see the thing where serving in the US military was an official method of renouncing your NDN-ness and becoming an “American” instead. (Before the universal citizenship act, Native people got citizenship person-by-person, by doing something that asserted that they weren’t “really” Indians anymore. Serving in the military was one of those things.)
So given all that, Pocahontas dressed in red-white-and-blue, boosting for the US nation-state? How subversive is that, really? 
Note, please, the issue of patriotism and military service in Indian Country is complicated. I in no way mean to suggest that it isn’t. There are lots of reasons that NDNs will wear the stars and stripes, man, I’d love to see a nuanced exploration of that.
But re the alleged subversiveness of this illustration? The US has usually been thrilled to see NDNs don the red, white, and blue. I’m just saying.
tl;dr: Pocahontas wasn’t an American — not the way you mean it here — and portraying her as one falls solidly within the US colonialist tradition.

sanguinarysanguinity:

kingloptr:

tamahi88:

copperbadge:

elliphantidelli:

"kneel"

something i drew for a banner competition :) 

POCAHONTAS AS CAP THO

Why not? She’s an original American

THATS WHY WE’RE EXCITED BC THEY GOT IT RIGHT

Did they get it right, though? There’s a long, long history of Native people being co-opted or coerced into displaying the symbols of US patriotism. And it was always done to deny the Native genocide, legitimize the US state, and consolidate the US’s power.

For example, there’s a lot of old-fashioned rhetoric out there that Native people were the first US patriots. (Take Paul Dyck’s Brulé: The Sioux People of the Rosebud, in which he describes 19th century Lakota — who were at war with the US! — as “American patriots” and asserts that “throughout the trying historical period of westward expansion, the Indian of the West never lost their allegiance to America.”) I run across this kind of talk a lot, in which someone asserts that a Native people were all about liberty and freedom JUST LIKE AMERICA, thus there’s just one big unbroken tradition of AMERICAFREEDOMLIBERTY leading from Native people to the US nation-state. What’s genocide? What’s colonialism? It was just Native-USians acting as the warm-up act for the American-Usians.

Furthermore, there’s a long, long history of the US government requiring subjugated Native people to display symbols of US patriotism. Know why so many powwows are on the Fourth of July? Because the government’s Indian Agents would only permit festivals that celebrated Christian holidays or the US nation-state.

Moreover, see the thing where serving in the US military was an official method of renouncing your NDN-ness and becoming an “American” instead. (Before the universal citizenship act, Native people got citizenship person-by-person, by doing something that asserted that they weren’t “really” Indians anymore. Serving in the military was one of those things.)

So given all that, Pocahontas dressed in red-white-and-blue, boosting for the US nation-state? How subversive is that, really? 

Note, please, the issue of patriotism and military service in Indian Country is complicated. I in no way mean to suggest that it isn’t. There are lots of reasons that NDNs will wear the stars and stripes, man, I’d love to see a nuanced exploration of that.

But re the alleged subversiveness of this illustration? The US has usually been thrilled to see NDNs don the red, white, and blue. I’m just saying.

tl;dr: Pocahontas wasn’t an American — not the way you mean it here — and portraying her as one falls solidly within the US colonialist tradition.

(via disneydiversity)

Africa
Toto / Toto IV

highrelease:

Toto | Africa

18,259 plays
December, 1963 (Oh, What A Night)
Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons / 25th Anniversary Collection (CD 3)

lbradz:

December, 1963 (Oh, What a Night) - Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons

8,635 plays
Only The Good Die Young
Billy Joel / The Stranger

radtracks:

only the good die young // billy joel

you might have heard i run with a dangerous crowd
we ain’t too pretty, we ain’t too proud
we might be laughing a bit too loud
oh, but that never hurt no one

3,765 plays
Smooth
Santana feat. Rob Thomas / Supernatural

highrelease:

Santana feat. Rob Thomas | Smooth

2,535 plays
Dangerous
Big Data

(Source: les-nocturnes)

9,053 plays

fistingmyself:

jirachipng:

inumuzu:

knives-and-pipes:

upgraders:

most private thing im willing to admit: im not good at estimating how much pasta is enough for one person 

image there’s a tool for that

why is it shaped like a horse

"im so hungry i could eat a horse"

im so hungry i could eat a child

(via rebloggingmylikes)

fandomsandfeminism:

xxtopamaxx:

Wtf?! How the hell does that work?! Dumb bitch

Did you consider googleing this to see what she was referring to? Because I wasn’t sure either, but sure enough, a quick google search found: 
Clime Change will affect women more severly than men

The report, Gender and Climate Change(available here as a PDF), concludes that women are more severely affected by climate change and natural disasters because of their social roles and because of discrimination and poverty. To make matters worse, they’re also underrepresented in decision-making about climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, and, most critically, discussions and decisions about adaptation and mitigation. From the report:

For example, the 20,000 people who died in France during the extreme heat wave in Europe in 2003 included significantly more elderly women than men. In natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, both in developing and in developed countries, it is primarily the poor who have suffered—and all over the world, the majority of the poor are women, who at all levels earn less than men. In developing countries, women living in poverty bear a disproportionate burden of climate change consequences. Because of women’s marginalized status and dependence on local natural resources, their domestic burdens are increased, including additional work to fetch water, or to collect fuel and fodder. In some areas, climate change generates resource shortages and unreliable job markets, which lead to increased male-out migration and more women left behind with additional agricultural and households duties. Poor women’s lack of access to and control over natural resources, technologies and credit mean that they have fewer resources to cope with seasonal and episodic weather and natural disasters. Consequently traditional roles are reinforced, girls’ education suffers, and women’s ability to diversify their livelihoods (and therefore their capacity to access income-generating jobs) is diminished.

The report notes examples from other sources, including this:

An Oxfam Report (March 2005) on the impact of the 2004 Asia Tsunami on women raised alarms about gender imbalances since the majority of those killed and among those least able to recover were women. In Aceh, for example, more than 75 percent of those who died were women, resulting in a male-female ratio of 3:1 among the survivors. As so many mothers died, there have been major consequences with respect to infant mortality, early marriage of girls, neglect of girls’ education, sexual assault, trafficking in women and prostitution. These woes, however, are largely neglected in the media coverage.

And this:

In a study executed on behalf of ACTIONAID in 1993-1994 in the Himalayan region of Nepal, it became clear that environmental degradation has compounded stress within households and pressure on scarce resources. This meant that the pressure on children, particularly girl children, to do more work and at an earlier age was increasing. Girls do the hardiest work, have the least say and the fewest education options. Programmes that concentrate only on sending more girls to school were failing as the environmental and social conditions of the families deteriorated.


Amazing what a 5 second google search will teach you.

fandomsandfeminism:

xxtopamaxx:

Wtf?! How the hell does that work?! Dumb bitch

Did you consider googleing this to see what she was referring to? Because I wasn’t sure either, but sure enough, a quick google search found: 

Clime Change will affect women more severly than men

The report, Gender and Climate Change(available here as a PDF), concludes that women are more severely affected by climate change and natural disasters because of their social roles and because of discrimination and poverty. To make matters worse, they’re also underrepresented in decision-making about climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, and, most critically, discussions and decisions about adaptation and mitigation. From the report:

For example, the 20,000 people who died in France during the extreme heat wave in Europe in 2003 included significantly more elderly women than men. In natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, both in developing and in developed countries, it is primarily the poor who have suffered—and all over the world, the majority of the poor are women, who at all levels earn less than men. In developing countries, women living in poverty bear a disproportionate burden of climate change consequences. Because of women’s marginalized status and dependence on local natural resources, their domestic burdens are increased, including additional work to fetch water, or to collect fuel and fodder. In some areas, climate change generates resource shortages and unreliable job markets, which lead to increased male-out migration and more women left behind with additional agricultural and households duties. Poor women’s lack of access to and control over natural resources, technologies and credit mean that they have fewer resources to cope with seasonal and episodic weather and natural disasters. Consequently traditional roles are reinforced, girls’ education suffers, and women’s ability to diversify their livelihoods (and therefore their capacity to access income-generating jobs) is diminished.

The report notes examples from other sources, including this:

An Oxfam Report (March 2005) on the impact of the 2004 Asia Tsunami on women raised alarms about gender imbalances since the majority of those killed and among those least able to recover were women. In Aceh, for example, more than 75 percent of those who died were women, resulting in a male-female ratio of 3:1 among the survivors. As so many mothers died, there have been major consequences with respect to infant mortality, early marriage of girls, neglect of girls’ education, sexual assault, trafficking in women and prostitution. These woes, however, are largely neglected in the media coverage.

And this:

In a study executed on behalf of ACTIONAID in 1993-1994 in the Himalayan region of Nepal, it became clear that environmental degradation has compounded stress within households and pressure on scarce resources. This meant that the pressure on children, particularly girl children, to do more work and at an earlier age was increasing. Girls do the hardiest work, have the least say and the fewest education options. Programmes that concentrate only on sending more girls to school were failing as the environmental and social conditions of the families deteriorated.

Amazing what a 5 second google search will teach you.

piertotum-locomottor:

youvegottthelove:

im-just-a-match-in-water:

toyoungtolivethisway:

officialalltimelow:

Press play and enjoy fuckers.

holy

At first I’m just like “it’s fucking clapping, I don’t ca-” and then he began to sing and I took in such a deep breath my uncle had to make sure I was ok.

GOOD BYE FRIENDS I AM GONE

If you don’t reblog an acoustic version of My Songs Know What You Did In The Dark (Light ‘Em Up), something is wrong with you.

(via colorfuloddity)

2,610,785 plays
You Really Got Me
The Kinks / The Ultimate Collection (Disc One)

lletstalkaboutmusic:

The Kinks - You Really Got Me

97,391 plays